Typhlological museum / Exhibitions
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Crossing the Boundaries
08.11.2012 - 14.12.2012
Nevenka Ćosić
Typhlological Museum

DOCUMENTA OPHTHALMOLOGICA …stories from an ophthalmological surgery
20.12.2011 - 20.03.2012
Lucija Šoda
Typhlological Museum

99 isn’t 100
13.10.2011 - 13.11.2011
Željka Sušić, Davor Šiftar
Typhlological Museum

Vision from the dark prof. Franjo Tonković, blind scientist
21.12.2010 - 18.01.2011
Željka Bosnar Salihagić, Nevenka Ćosić
Typhlological Museum

The Uncovering PETAR BARIŠIĆ
16.09.2010 - 11.10.2010
Typhlological Museum

99 isn’t 100

99 isn’t 100

99 isn’t 100

The activities and programs of the Typhlological Museum send messages
about the importance of every person. This time we have focused our
activities towards people who have sacrificed their life for the greater
good. After the Homeland War, post traumatic stress disorder became one
of the most common diagnoses in Croatia, and the recovery is long-lasting
and hard.
The name of the exhibition, 99 isn’t 100, was taken from a documentary
and we used it to shed light on the necessity of social care for every
individual and to say that every person is important because even one
person can make a difference.
The selection of sculptures for the exhibition always follows a certain
criterion, and the sculptures exhibited in the Typhlological Museum and
their place in the catalogue are the result of two decisions. First, we
wanted to present all the participants of our sculpting workshop because
we believe their interest in art deserves it. Our museum enabled them to
model sculptures and, for the first time, implement a part of themselves
in the works that tell tales of fear, sorrow, struggle and hope. Why have we
devoted special attention to two authors? Vladimir and Nedjeljko’s initial
spark hasn’t faded – they have even found a peaceful place in their homes
to keep on creating. The beauty of creation overwhelmed them so before
us today we have exhibits created in their ateliers.
At one moment life imposed the role of warriors on them, and when
that role expired, they weren’t able to get back to their life again easily.
They still look for it sometimes, and we hope that we have opened the
door to the world of art, in which it is always better to be a creator than a
spectator. We believe and hope that the world of clay and pencil will help
them weather their problems more easily and that this exhibition will
mark the beginning of a new path.


Željka Sušić

The Joy of Creation


A creative response to the impacts of the environment is immanent to sensitive
talented individuals. Vladimir Bušljeta and Nedjeljko Herceg mastered the material surprisingly quickly in just a few workshops organized in the Typhlological Museum, which enabled them to incorporate their ideas into a form of art. Little time passed from the initial careful examination of clay to a magical cooperation of the material and their fingers. All uneasiness vanished and the mastered skill opened new space for creation. The joy of creation is one of the ways in which our authors liberated themselves from the shackles of their difficult experiences and destructive memories. But those painful memories must also be the source of their creation... Someone who had looked death in the eye must have a different perception of the image of Christ; someone who hadn’t been sure whether they would come back to the world they lived in will differently grasp the everyday life of that world, the world of Joža, the accordion player, and godmother Bara.Even though they lack the academic training in sculpting, their talent and their newly acquired skill enable the image and the chosen role model to find their way and gain form while the fingers create forms of clay honestly and patiently. The forms standing before us today grew out of
the contemplation and quiet inner dialogue of the author with the subject
matter and the material. Erceg’s notion of Christ and Moses, his allegorical depiction of Adam and Eve or the mythical unicorn, Bušljeta’s kind, good-humored characters, his portrait of a friend (Hombre), the gracious Bather and the pain seen on a woman’s face, which shows us that the author is closely familiar with pain – they all deserve attention, they are all equally important to the authors and everything is modeled on the joy of creation. The exhibited sculptures give us a glimpse of how this creative streak will continue and indicate that we are yet to see their best work.


Davor Šiftar

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